Aili Vindi guaššmaalid

 

 Aili-Vint-Geomeetriline-maal-10

 

 

Aili-Vindi guashmaal Päikeseloojang

  

 

Aili-Vint-Geomeetriline-maal-28

 

 

   

   

Aili-Vint-Geomeetriline-maal-4

 

 

Aili-Vint-Geomeetriline-maal-24

          

 

                   Aili-Vindi guashmaal Lein

 

 

aili vindi guashmaal Puhkemine

 

 

Aili-Vindi guashmaal

 

 

Aili-Vint-Geomeetriline-maal-14

 

 

Aili-Vint-Geomeetriline-maal-8

 

 

Aili-Vint guashmaal 4

                                                                         Aili-Vint-Geomeetriline-maal-16

Aili-Vint guashmaal Muld

 

 

 AV031

 

 

Aili Vindi guashimaal Massiivid

 

 

Aili-Vint-Geomeetriline-maal-1

 

 _ATD2915

_ATD2907

 

 

Aili-Vint guashmaal 10

 

 

Aili-Vint guashmaal 8

 

_ATD2911

 

In the beginning of my career as an artist I loved picking vibrant colours, comparing their lightness-darkness and boldly transferring them to the canvas without much awareness of where this came from. This resulted in op-art, which was innovative at the time. Later I learned that there is an acclaimed artist named Ay-O  in Japan, who uses the same kind of striped gradient motifs in his paintings. He was already famous at that time and I might have been pegged as a plagiarist: Someone named Ai-Li does the same thing as the Japanese Ay-O! I abruptly gave up the styl I had invented, despite the fact that it held a lot of promise for development. It was a pity, of course, but I actually enjoyed this unexpected turn in my work, which gave me the opportunity to start painting the sea instead, something that I had already dreamt of as a child.

Meri on sõlmes 2000 acrylic 42x150cm

Knotted up Sea, 2000, acryl on millboard, 42x150cm